Ep. 8 – The Party / No Exit

After the wedding scenes that 3005 soundtracks in the screenplay, the script cuts to The Boy playing piano at his mansion as people start to arrive for yet another party, prompting the beginning of Act 3, the aptly-titled “Playing Around Before the Party Starts.”

“It was the closest you could get to having powers.”

BTI Screenplay, Act 3

The mansion is starting to get messier and messier, and apparently the cleaners have stopped showing up because they weren’t being paid. There’s trash everywhere, surfaces are sticky, and you can’t slide around on the floor. The script mourns this: “Now, dried alcohol stops you before you even get to the kitchen door. The Boy really loved sliding into the kitchen when he was a kid. It was the closest you could get to having powers.

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Ep. 7 – 3005

In our first ever video analysis, we break down the 3005 music video (above).


BTI Screenplay

Still in Oakland, the crew head to a hotel for the night and see a wedding happening in the lobby. The crew leaves, but The Boy stays to watch the wedding. While filming the couple dancing, an older Indian dude comes up to The Boy, a sort of “meeting with the mentor” in traditional literary structures on The Boy’s current “road of trials.”

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Ep. 5 – “Telegraph Ave. (‘Oakland’ by Lloyd)” by Childish Gambino

MetA” (from the Greek μετά-, meta-, meaning “after” or “beyond”): a prefix meaning more comprehensive or transcending.

“Telegraph Ave.” features a meta “song-within-a-song” structure and scores The Boy driving to Oakland. As “Oakland” by LLoyd transcends the car radio into the screenplay, we watch The Boy, now in the driver’s seat, symbolically taking agency over his life.

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Ep. 4 – Dial-Up / I. The Worst Guys / II. Shadows

As Act Two begins, The Boy examines the sleep-walking existence he’s been living. This process is slow, and fittingly, Act Two begins with the instrumental track “Dial Up.”

Continue reading “Ep. 4 – Dial-Up / I. The Worst Guys / II. Shadows”

Ep. 2 – The Library/Crawl

With his 2013 album Because the Internet, Donald Glover sought to construct a transmedia world by weaving together physical, sonic, visual, and online material Under his pseudonym Childish Gambino. For the most comprehensive compilation of the world’s components, visit S7 co-writer Camden Ostrander’s piktochart.

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Season 7: Because The Internet

Dissect Season 7 on Because The Internet by Childish Gambino begins NOW, only on Spotify.

Go deeper into the BTI world with our visual guides and the Because The Internet screenplay. For the most immersive experience, view both the visual guides and the screenplay excerpts before or after an episode.

Season 7 will be exclusive to Spotify until January 2021. Podcasts are FREE on Spotify – don’t need a premium account to listen.

S7E1 – The Transmedia World of Because The Internet

“I wanted to make something that says, no matter how bad you fuck up, or mistakes you’ve made during the year, your life, your eternity. You’re always allowed to be better. You’re always allowed to grow up. If you want.”

Donald Glover’s open letter, posted to Instagram, describing his 2013 album, Because the Internet, released under his pseudonym “Childish Gambino”

Donald McKinley Glover Jr.

Born on September 25, 1983 at Edwards Air Force Base in California, Donald grew up with his siblings Bree and Stephen, as well as a steady flow of foster children. His mother Beverly ran a daycare from their home in Stone Mountain, Georgia, and his father, Donald Sr, was in the Air Force and later was a postal worker.

Pictured left to right: Bree, Donald Sr., Beverly, Stephen, and Donald.

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Ep. 3 – Worldstar

It’s an Internet cesspool that’s cashed in big on senseless fight videos. The site’s popularity has created a sort of voyeuristic feedback loop, in which disassociated bystanders immediately videotape violent incidents and act as if they’re already watching a video on the Internet”

Gothamist

“Blow up /
Worldstar before rap you already know that”

The album’s animated cover exemplifies Gambino’s first words on this track, “Blow up,” suggesting violence and explosion, but also the process by which a person or piece of content can go viral. This duality of violence and virality will reverberate throughout the track.

Continue reading “Ep. 3 – Worldstar”

“Blow up /
Worldstar before rap you already know that”

The album’s animated cover exemplifies Gambino’s first words on this track, “Blow up,” suggesting violence and explosion, but also the process by which a person or piece of content can go viral. This duality of violence and virality will reverberate throughout the track.

Continue reading “Ep. 3 – Worldstar”